Fuck Yeah American Art!

A tumblog dedicated to the American arts, focusing on, but not limited to, paintings from the 18th century forward.
necspenecmetu:

Charles Lewis Fussell, A Young Art Student (Portrait of Thomas Eakins), c. 1860-5

necspenecmetu:

Charles Lewis Fussell, A Young Art Student (Portrait of Thomas Eakins), c. 1860-5

theerinater:

Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, 1872
When Moran returned from his expedition to Yellowstone, the government bought this painting for $10,000. Moran is one of the reasons why Yellowstone was designated as a National Park from the start. 

theerinater:

Thomas Moran, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, 1872

When Moran returned from his expedition to Yellowstone, the government bought this painting for $10,000. Moran is one of the reasons why Yellowstone was designated as a National Park from the start. 

mademoisellelapiquante:

Three Way Portrait: Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe and Unidentified Native American - Smithsonian American Art Museum (undated, artist unknown)

mademoisellelapiquante:

Three Way Portrait: Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe and Unidentified Native American - Smithsonian American Art Museum (undated, artist unknown)

philamuseum:

ZOOM-IN: How Do You Keep Your Loved Ones Close?
Delicate ivory portrait miniatures like these once helped Americans keep their loved ones—quite literally—close to the chest.  Hinting at ties that bind, Americans often had themselves painted in miniature with the ones they loved clasped in miniature around their necks. Often exchanged as secret tokens between lovers and courting couples or worn to commemorate the recently deceased, such portraits often seemed to live and breathe alongside their wearers. The velvety texture of the ivory mimicked the look and feel of human skin at the same time that the painted eyes of these portraits seemed to shimmer and cheeks flush with what one writer called the “living light” transmitted through the translucent ivory. The organic material was even able to catch up to human body temperature when worn directly against the skin, making these portraits pretty hot presents when exchanged by secret flames. –Katie Pfohl, Barra Fellow in American Art
"Portrait of Maria Bassett", 1801, James Peale http://ow.ly/meWsV
"Abraham Woodside", 1810, Attributed to John Archibald Woodside http://ow.ly/meWL0

philamuseum:

ZOOM-IN: How Do You Keep Your Loved Ones Close?

Delicate ivory portrait miniatures like these once helped Americans keep their loved ones—quite literally—close to the chest.  Hinting at ties that bind, Americans often had themselves painted in miniature with the ones they loved clasped in miniature around their necks. Often exchanged as secret tokens between lovers and courting couples or worn to commemorate the recently deceased, such portraits often seemed to live and breathe alongside their wearers. The velvety texture of the ivory mimicked the look and feel of human skin at the same time that the painted eyes of these portraits seemed to shimmer and cheeks flush with what one writer called the “living light” transmitted through the translucent ivory. The organic material was even able to catch up to human body temperature when worn directly against the skin, making these portraits pretty hot presents when exchanged by secret flames. –Katie Pfohl, Barra Fellow in American Art

"Portrait of Maria Bassett", 1801, James Peale http://ow.ly/meWsV

"Abraham Woodside", 1810, Attributed to John Archibald Woodside http://ow.ly/meWL0