Fuck Yeah American Art!

A tumblog dedicated to the American arts, focusing on, but not limited to, paintings from the 18th century forward.
cavetocanvas:

John Singleton Copley, A Boy with a Flying Squirrel (Henry Pelham), 1765
From the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston:

John Singleton Copley grew up in Boston before formal artistic training was available anywhere in this country. Largely self-taught, by the mid-1760s he was the most sought-after portraitist in New England. He aspired, however, to more than provincial success and wanted to know how his work would be gauged by sophisticated English standards. To find out, in 1765 he painted a portrait of his stepbrother, Henry Pelham, not as a commission but rather for exhibition in London. A Boy with a Flying Squirrel (Henry Pelham) was calculated to demonstrate everything that Copley could do. It differed markedly from his commissioned portraits in its subtly complex composition. Here, Copley chose to paint his sitter in profile rather than using a typical frontal likeness and has placed him behind a table that seemingly juts out into the viewer’s space. Pelham dreamily gazes upward with parted lips, as if in a reverie. Copley masterfully unified the composition with his use of color: the rich reds of the drapery and the mahogany table are picked up in the boy’s ruby lips and the skin tones of his face, as well as in the pink collar. Most brilliant of all, perhaps, is Copley’s ability to depict a variety of textures—for example, the boy’s skin and the soft fur of the squirrel, the highly polished table, and the reflections of the glass of water.

cavetocanvas:

John Singleton Copley, A Boy with a Flying Squirrel (Henry Pelham), 1765

From the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston:

John Singleton Copley grew up in Boston before formal artistic training was available anywhere in this country. Largely self-taught, by the mid-1760s he was the most sought-after portraitist in New England. He aspired, however, to more than provincial success and wanted to know how his work would be gauged by sophisticated English standards. To find out, in 1765 he painted a portrait of his stepbrother, Henry Pelham, not as a commission but rather for exhibition in London. 

A Boy with a Flying Squirrel (Henry Pelham) was calculated to demonstrate everything that Copley could do. It differed markedly from his commissioned portraits in its subtly complex composition. Here, Copley chose to paint his sitter in profile rather than using a typical frontal likeness and has placed him behind a table that seemingly juts out into the viewer’s space. Pelham dreamily gazes upward with parted lips, as if in a reverie. Copley masterfully unified the composition with his use of color: the rich reds of the drapery and the mahogany table are picked up in the boy’s ruby lips and the skin tones of his face, as well as in the pink collar. Most brilliant of all, perhaps, is Copley’s ability to depict a variety of textures—for example, the boy’s skin and the soft fur of the squirrel, the highly polished table, and the reflections of the glass of water.

  1. momential reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  2. intergalacticspace reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  3. mmex reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  4. walrusangel reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  5. spookyeyeball reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  6. levliberman reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  7. hersphinxness reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  8. allthingsbrightandb0ld reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  9. red-astrachan reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  10. xiuxiueig reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  11. poopmurk reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  12. icarus-suraki reblogged this from my-ear-trumpet
  13. justplainsami reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  14. fallingpoly reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  15. champagne4lulu reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  16. mapsofcanadiana reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  17. jointhecauselunasarmy reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  18. khaloodh reblogged this from cavetocanvas and added:
    that’s an amazing amount of details in everything.
  19. rougerothko reblogged this from theforbiddencolors
  20. sacredkarcram reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  21. dateswithlesbians reblogged this from painted-fire
  22. throughtheturnstile reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  23. painted-fire reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  24. methusellaneous reblogged this from my-ear-trumpet
  25. mr-sun-3 reblogged this from cavetocanvas
  26. notaboutnormal reblogged this from my-ear-trumpet and added:
    A Boy with a Flying Squirrel (Henry Pelham), 1765 By John Singleton Copley Museum of Fine Arts, Boston: John Singleton...
  27. peonypompa reblogged this from cavetocanvas